Calendar is loading...
Powered by Booking Calendar

Uncategorized

Hello world!

Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start writing!

Experience the Beauty of Ancient Syracuse

Like no other city, Syracuse captures Sicily’s ageless beauty. Ancient Greek ruins rise out of plush citrus orchards, cafe’s spill onto dazzling baroque piazzas, and timeless cobbled lanes lead down to the cobalt blue sea. In its day, the largest city in the ancient world, larger than Athens and Corinth. In 734 BC, when Corinthian colonists landed on the island of Ortygia and founded the city, setting up the mainland fortress four years later. Now, the ruins of that then-new city constitute the Parco Archeologico della Neapolis, one of Sicily’s greatest archaeological sites. Across the water from the mainland, Ortygia remains the city’s most stunning corner, an imperiously chic, marvel with an ever-growing legion of admirers.

Sigmund Freud described Sicily as ‘the loveliest region of Italy: a stunning orgy of colours, scents, and lights… a great delight’, and Siracusa (as the locals call it) in the south east of the island has been inspiring people for ever.

A BIT OF HISTORY: Local inventor (he gave us the catapult!) and mathematician Archimedes was famously moved to run naked into its streets shouting ‘Eureka’ after his discovery about volume upon stepping into the bath and Cicero said it was ‘the greatest Greek city and the most beautiful of them all’.
Explore on foot: Ortigia, an island reached by bridges, is pedestrianised in the summer months

It’s no longer the most visited city in the Mediterranean – Greek or otherwise – but its beauty is still there. Like nearby Noto rebuilt after the 1693 earthquake, Syracuse’s heart and soul, Ortigia, is a Homoresque island of un-imaginable beauty

Pedestrianised during the summer, its charm is in its meandering shadowed lanes, with honey coloured walls, baroque iron balconies above, vast churches and pavement cafes. The shops are idiosyncratic; for example try the Fish House Art Shop on Via Cavour for every kind of fish imaginable in every kind of medium.

MARKET DAY: Ortigia’s daily food market is brash, loud, vibrant and an authentic daily experience for the locals and tourists alike. Admire and taste the freshest ricotta, fish, pastries and deli snacks.
A great favourite is the Sicilian run Caseificio Borderi, on Via Emmanuele De Benedectis, within the market. There’s no menu the owner decodes what yo would like.

Eat like a Sicilian, at some of the most exquisite Italian restaurants you could wish for

There’s a lot to like about Sicily. Pristine beaches with turquoise waters perfect for swimming in; ancient architecture steeped in some of the Mediterranean’s richest history; towering volcanoes rising out of beautiful countryside and a relaxed way of life that makes you want to turn any visit to the island into a permanent holiday. But of course, as with most of Italy, the main attraction is the local food scene.

Sicilian cuisine is incredibly unique – while much of it is clearly Italian (there’s plenty of pastas, olive oils, wines and seafood) there are some commonly used ingredients that clearly stand out. Raisins and saffron crop up in the island’s most famous dishes, and cooking techniques differ from those found on the mainland. Sicily has been conquered by a whole host of different nations over the years, including the Phoenicians of North Africa, the Islamic Moors, Greeks, Romans, Normans and Spanish, among others. By the time the island joined the Kingdom of Italy in 1861, the local culture (and food) was so heavily influenced by its past that it was always going to stand out.

Today, Sicily is one of Italy’s most popular tourist destinations, and it’s the food that keeps people coming back year after year. Soaking up the scenery and eating some of the best food in Europe – what’s not to like? If you’re wondering which dishes you should try to get a true taste of the local cuisine while you’re there, make a note of the ones listed below and get ready to enjoy a sun-drenched, flavour-filled, history-steeped holiday.

Eating Al Fresco

A Traditional Sicilian Pizza

Sfincione dough

20g of yeast
500ml of warm water
500g of soft wheat flour
500g of durum wheat flour
25g of salt
50g of extra virgin olive oil

Passata

1.5kg tomato pulp, made of crushed tomatoes (including skins, seeds and flesh). You can use crushed tinned tomatoes instead if preferred
3 garlic cloves, sliced
3 sprigs of basil
9g of salt
9g of sugar
olive oil

Sfincione topping

30g of anchovy
1.5l passata
250g of Caciocavallo cheese, fresh, grated
100g of aged Ragusano cheese, grated
30g of breadcrumbs
50g of extra virgin olive oil
oregano, as needed

1. To make the sfincione dough, dissolve the yeast in the water and leave for 5 minutes to activate

500ml of water
20g of yeast

2. Once the yeast has started to foam a little, add the flours, then the salt and oil. Knead well, cover with a damp cloth, and let rise for 1 hour at 30°C

50g of extra virgin olive oil
500g of soft wheat flour
500g of durum wheat flour
25g of salt

3. Meanwhile, make the passata. Lightly fry the garlic and basil in a dash of oil. Add the tomato pulp and season with the salt and sugar

3 garlic cloves
3 sprigs of basil
olive oil
1.5kg tomato pulp, made of crushed tomatoes (including skins, seeds and flesh). You can use crushed tinned tomatoes instead if preferred
9g of salt
9g of sugar

4. Stir well, allowing the flavours to infuse and the tomatoes to heat through (about 8 minutes), then remove the basil sprigs and transfer the sauce to a blender. Blitz until very smooth, then set aside

5. Preheat the oven to 180°C/gas mark 4

6. Roll out the dough and place in the baking tray. Garnish with the anchovy, Caciocavallo cheese, passata, grated Ragusano cheese, breadcrumbs, oregano and extra virgin olive oil

7. Bake for 3 minutes in our authentic pizza oven, then remove and allow to cool slightly before slicing and serving

Scroll to top
call now